Call for Papers

January 25, 2019

The Korean Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies (KAMEMES)

 

Call for Papers

 

Mediality and Intermediality in Medieval and Renaissance English Literature

 

The Korean Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies (KAMEMES) cordially invites scholars of the classic, medieval and Renaissance studies in English literature and of related disciplines to an international conference that will be held in Seoul on Saturday, October 19, 2019, under the title of Mediality and Intermediality in Medieval and Renaissance Literature. 

 

As a form of art, literature communicates through discrete media—for example, oral performance, written words, image, scroll, codex, manuscript, print, e-book, etc. If media can be conceptualized as the mode that perceives, stores, and conveys narrative or textuality, then mediality may refer to the particular material or technical condition wherein each medium operates, and intermediality the manner that different media affect—enhance or interfere—one another. Historically, medial development has most likely conditioned the development of literature, and medieval and Renaissance literature is no exception. The gradual transition from oral to written transmission of literature in the late medieval period, the production of cheaper printed books that revolutionized the entire geography of literary culture in late medieval and early modern society, and the adoption of the folio format by Hemminge and Condell for the 1623 edition of Shakespeare’s works that contributed to inducing novel ways of reading Shakespeare in seventeenth-century England are just a few of the instances that indicate the necessity of discussing the themes of mediality and intermediality in the fields of medieval and Renaissance literature. This proposal comes with a reflection that traditionally textuality has played the role of the protagonist in literary studies while mediality the role of an invisible assistant, and also with a timely hope that an extended reading of literature that includes mediality and intermediality may further extend the significance and scope of literary studies. 

 

Topics to be discussed include but are not limited to the following:

 

● Relevance of applying media theories to the classic, medieval and Renaissance studies in literature 

● Relationship of textuality and mediality/intermediality in literature

● Transition from orality to literacy in late medieval and early modern periods  

● Transition from manuscript culture to printing culture

● Medieval and Renaissance documentary practices and extra-textual components—ars dictaminis, amanuensis, dictation, epistle, seal, messenger, forgery, etc.   

● Interplay of words and images in written texts 

● Relationship of words, images, and sounds in concrete/visual poems (e.g. George Herbert’s “Easter Wings”) 

● Adaptation and reception of classical literature in medieval and Renaissance literature

● Adaptation of the classic, medieval and Renaissance literature in modern media, including photography, film, (radio & television) drama, comics, graphic novels, games, etc.

● Significance of performance and performativity in medial/intermedial aesthetics of literature 

● Role of readers in medial/intermedial aesthetics of literature  

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